US Visa Success Profile

Case/U.S. Visa Success References

Our Law Firm represent individuals in U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh and U.S. Administrative, Federal and Judicial Department on unusual visa matters, visa refusals, visa revocations, problems, difficulties, complications, Request for Evidence (RFE) & Notice of Intend to Deny (NOID), Transportation Letter, Waiver of Inadmissibility, Special Immigration for overstayed Green Card Holders, Re-Entry Permit, Replacement & Renew of Green Card, Child Adoption & Adoption Visa, Visit Visa, Investment Visa, H1B Visa, Family Immigration, U.S. Citizens Child Birth Registration and Passport application in U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh and also very many different cases. Below we have summarized some of the cases in which we were able to assist these individuals successfully.

NOTE: IF YOUR FACTS MATCH WITH OUR UNDER NOTED CASE/VISA SUCCESS REFERENCES, YOU ARE MOST WELCOME TO SEE OUR SUCCESS PROFILE TO VISIT OUR LAW FIRM WITH PRIOR APPOINTMENT TO DISCUSS YOUR CASE WITH OUR CHIEF BARRISTER M. R. I. CHOWDHURY, U.S. VISA & IMMIGRATION SPECIALIST LAWYER.

 

Case-1

The applicant had been denied a B-2 visa five times under Section 214(b). Unfortunately, he had not been honest in his previous applications about the fact that his sister was located in the U. S. He contacted us, and we brought him “out of the shadows”, helping him to “come clean” with the U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh. We prepared a new application evidencing the bona fides of his business in Bangladesh and his stable family and economic situation there. After extensive review, the Embassy issued to him a visa.

Case-2

The applicant was denied an F-2 visa on two occasions. She sought to join her student husband in the United States. Because such visa refusals are supposed to be “rare” and warranted only when there is a difference in circumstances between the spouses, we challenged these denials. The applicant was called in for another interview, and issued the visa.

Case-3

The applicant was denied an IR-1 immigrant visa due to only issue regarding legality and validity of her marriage document. His marriage was registered under Special Marriage Act 1872 in Bangladesh with U.S. Citizen. But the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh did not accept such marriage document and registration as genuine and questioned the legality of their marriage under local law and refused husband of U.S. Citizens IR-1 visa as invalid marriage documents. Because such marriage is supposed to be “rare” in Bangladesh and warranted only when there is a difference in circumstances between the spouses. The applicant including his U.S. Citizen Petitioner retained our law firm. We challenged this denial submitting our Expert Opinion including credible clarification regarding Special Marriage Act 1872. After extensive review, the applicant was called in for another interview, and issued immigrant visa.

Case-4

The applicant is a Bangladesh Government accredited Journalist. He got I Visa from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka and had entered into U.S. under Duration of Status (D/S) to cover report on 67th and 68th United Nation General Assemble including visit United Nations Headquarters and cover United Nations activities regarding the South Asia and cover on Bangladeshi Community, history, heritage and lifestyle of USA as part of his employment assignment. Later, the applicant had applied again for Non-Immigrant I Visa interview to cover report on 69th United National General Assemble. But his visa application was refused by U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh and he had been bar to enter into USA for 3 Years. The concern visa officer had stated in visa refusal letter that as follows: You were found ineligible for a non-immigrant visa under section 212(a)(9)(B)(i) or (ii) because you have violated the terms of a U.S. visa and unlawfully stayed in the U.S. for more/less than 365 days. You may re-apply after 3 years. He then engaged our law firm to represent his case with U.S. Embassy, Dhaka. On his behalf, we challenged the finding of the visa officer and eventually the finding was rescinded.

Case-5

We successfully assisted a woman obtain a tourist visa after she had been denied a visa on five occasions, dating back more than 18 years. She was denied in part because she had given birth a baby in the US and the cost of the delivery was paid for by the state. She then retained our firm, and we were able to clarify information about her refusals, present evidence to rebut the claims of the consular officers, and help her obtain a new B1/B2 five (5) years multi-entry visit visa.

Case-6

The applicant is the beneficiary/Spouse of U.S. Citizen. After interview his IR-1 Immigrant Visa application was denied under section 221(g) stating Administrative Processing and remained pending for more than 6 months. The applicant then retained our law firm, and within a couple of weeks, he received his visa and was reunited with his wife in the US.

Case-7

The applicant is the beneficiary/Brother of U.S. Citizen. After interview his F4 Immigrant Visa application was denied under section 221(g) stating Administrative Processing/ Additional Processing and remained pending for more than 12 months. The applicant then retained our law firm, and within a couple of weeks, he received his visa and was reunited with his sibling in the US.

Case-8

The applicant was entered into USA under B1/B2 (Visit) Visa in the year of 1998. He then overstayed in U.S. Later, in the year of 2001 the DMB Authority of U.S. filed a criminal case against the applicant known as Felony. Later, the applicant had got married to U.S. Citizen. He then voluntary departed from the U.S. in the year of 2007. His U.S. Citizen wife applied for him. He appeared for IR-1 Immigrant Visa Interview at the U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh. After interview the visa officer had given him a blue sheet form (OF-194). In this sheet it is stated that Arrest Record. The officer refused his immigrant visa and instructed him to submit Discharge Order from the relevant court of U.S. that he is not guilty. He then retained our law firm, and our associate criminal attorney were able to clarify information about his refusals, preparing a memorandum of law submitting credible evidences to the concern court of U.S. and rebut the claims of the consular officers. We then successfully discharged our client from the criminal case. After having submission Discharge Order of the relevant Court of U.S. to the U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh the applicant had been permanently barred from the United States by a consular officer without any justified reason. The Consular Officer advised him to apply for a waiver. The standard for granting a waiver to prove that the American citizen spouse would be subjected to extreme hardship in the event of denial is a difficult standard to meet. After submitting a waiver application, we strongly challenged the unfounded finding of the visa officer and prepared a memorandum of law submitting credible evidences and finally our waiver petition was approved, the finding of visa officer was overturned. The applicant was issued Immigrant Visa and able to join his wife in USA permanently.

Case-9

The applicant is the beneficiary/Sister of U.S. Citizen. After visa interview her F4 Immigrant Visa application was denied under section 212(a)(6)(c)(i) for committing a material misrepresentation and also under section 212(a)(6)(e) for committing smuggling which means Section 212(a)(6)(E) of the INA provides for the inadmissibility for visa issuance of any alien who at any time knowingly has encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted or aided any other alien including family members to enter or to try to enter the United States in violation of law. Her immigrant visa application was refused and the applicant was permanently barred to enter into USA by the US Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh for committing Material Misrepresentation/Misrepresentation of Facts [212(a)(6)(c)(i)] and Smuggling [212(a)(6)(E)]. She then contacted us and retained our law firm, and we were able to clarify information about her refusals. We strongly challenged the finding of the visa officer and prepared a memorandum of law submitting credible evidences and finally our submission was approved, the finding of visa officer was overturned. The applicant was issued Immigrant Visa and able to join his sibling in USA permanently.

Case-10

The applicant was issued an immigrant visa under F4 category (Brother of U.S. Citizen) from U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He then entered U.S. and was subsequently issued a Permanent resident card. Due to the time constraints on his initial entry into U.S. on the immigrant visa and started looking for some business options. His sister and brother-in-law also tried to assist him in this regard. Later, he then had to return back to Bangladesh to attend to his business with a mind-set of winding it up and returning to U.S. for good. Due to the instability in Bangladesh, He did not know how much time it would take for him to wind up his business. Before leaving U.S. he applied and was issued a re-entry permit by USCIS. After entered into Bangladesh he unfortunately lost his re-entry permit in Bangladesh. Relying on his online research, he applied for another re-entry permit while also trying to contact U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh for guidance. U.S. Embassy, Dhaka had given him mixed answers between applying for a re-entry permit and Transportation Permission. When his personal efforts did not bear fruit, he appointed our law firm to represent his case. We initiated contact with U.S. Embassy, Dhaka and had provided our submission with credible documentary evidences to U.S. Embassy, Dhaka. Our submission was successfully accepted by U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The Embassy was told to submit his passport which he promptly did. His first passport was somehow lost by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka and he was told to submit a fresh passport. He then had a fresh one issued by the Passport Department in Bangladesh and submitted his new passport to U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Diplomatically, a Transportation Permission was issued by U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh with a validity date of just one day. Subsequent requests to Embassy to extend the date on the Transportation Permission could not exceed the original expiration date on the re-entry. Our firm then challenged the one day Transportation Permission and eventually U.S. Embassy in Dhaka had issued him Special Immigrant Visa.

Case-11

Over the course of two years, the applicant spent most of her time in the US with her teenage daughter, who was enrolled at a famous ballet school. When the applicant returned to her home country to renew her visa, her application was denied under Section 214(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The consular officer accused her of illegally working in the US and spending too much time in the US; the officer made these claims despite the fact that when the applicant had applied for the visa two years prior, she had honestly notified the Embassy in advance of her plan to accompany her daughter for two years and presented bank statements showing her ability to support themselves in the US. Over the next two years, the Embassy denied her visa three more times. She then retained our firm, and we were able to clarify information about her refusals, present evidence to rebut the claims of the consular officers, and help her obtain a new B1/B2 five (5) years multi-entry visit visa.

Case-12

The applicant was a famous physicist in Bangladesh, and his petition for extraordinary ability was approved. However, because of the nature of his work, his application for adjustment of status was deemed sensitive by the US government and no action was taken on it for four years. After we filed a writ of mandamus in a federal district court, the US Attorneys office, which was responsible for defending the lawsuit, contacted USCIS. Within two weeks, USCIS approved the application for adjustment of status.

Case-13

The applicant worked as a teacher at an elementary school in Texas for several years in H-1B status. When he applied to renew his H-1B visa in U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh, the consular officer denied him, expressing his belief that Texas should be hiring American teachers. The school district then planned to terminate his contract because of his inability to return to the United States. Our firm brought this to the attention to the Department of State, and the consular officer issued the visa to the applicant.

Case-14

The applicant is a legal spouse of U.S. Citizen and his immigrant visa application initially denied by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh under section 221(g) for Administrative Processing. After upholding the decision for more than 12 months the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh had returned his petition to USCIS for revocation, the applicant contacted our firm. The consulate questioned the legality of divorce of U.S. Citizen under Bangladesh law. We immediately contacted the consulate, arranged for a new interview for her Bangladesh Husband. We strongly challenged the finding of the visa officer and prepared a memorandum of law submitting credible evidences including expert opinion and finally our submission was approved, the finding of visa officer was overturned. The applicant was issued Immigrant Visa and able to join his U.S. Citizen wife in USA permanently.

Case-15

A consular officer found the applicant permanently inadmissible to the United States as a drug trafficker under Section 212(a)(2)(C)(i)). The finding was made based on a single piece of evidence. We successfully challenged that decision and the bar to his admissibility was rescinded.

Case-16

Upon inquiry to the consulate, we learned that a consular officer mistakenly believed that the applicant was a mechanic and therefore denied him under Section 214(b) because his job was viewed as a weak tie to his home country. In fact, the applicant was the owner bona-fide machinery business. Upon presentation of additional evidence, he was issued a B1/B2 five (5) years multi-entry visa.

Case-17

The applicant is a young businessman of Chittagong, Bangladesh who visited 5 times in U.S. under B1/B2 (Visit) Visa and during his last visit he spent more than 4 months but less than 6 months. When he applied to receive a new visa, he was denied under Section 214(b) because he was spending too much time in the US and it was unclear how he was supporting himself. We prepared documentation evidencing the applicants finances, and reminded the U.S. Embassy, Dhaka that he did not overstayed. The U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh apologized for its misunderstanding. The Embassy welcome our client to re-apply and he including his wife received a new B1/B2 five (5) years multi-entry visa.

Case-18

While the applicant was in Bangladesh, he unfortunately lost his Green Card. We helped the applicant apply for a new green card and receive a Transportation Letter from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh, enabling him to return to the US for fingerprinting, obtaining a new I-551 stamp in his passport, and to eventually receive his new green card.

Case-19

We assisted an applicant overcome a finding of Section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) material misrepresentation for allegedly lying about his purpose to visit the United States. An overzealous consular officer permanently barred the applicant from the US; after our request to review the finding, his supervisor overturned the finding and issued to him an Immigrant visa.

Case-20

The applicant indicated in his application form that he planned to visit the US on business for two weeks. He received his visa. Upon his arrival, he ascertained that there were problems with his partner, so he had to hire a lawyer, participate in litigation, and find a new partner. As a result, he spent more than five months in the US. When he returned to Bangladesh and applied for a visa a year later, he was denied under Section 214(b). After we prepared a summary of the exigent circumstances that befell the applicant and supporting documentation, his application for a new visa was approved.

Case-21

The applicant was a green card holder and his green card was valid. He located outside the United States and stayed in Bangladesh for more than one year because his mother was very sick and eventually she died. He then retained our law firm, and we were able to clarify information about his over stayed in Bangladesh which was beyond his control, present credible documentary evidences to establish the claim of the applicant including memorandum of law showing how the applicant met the requirements of special immigrant visa. Our submission was successfully approved and the applicant including his wife and children were issued Special Immigrant Visa by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Case-22

We helped a young male applicant with few ties in Bangladesh (not married, no children, no property) secure a B1/B2 five (5) years multi-entry visitors visa from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Case-23

The applicant, a citizen of Bangladesh, was granted Asylum in the US. Subsequently, the Immigrant Visa application which he applied for his wife, son and daughter were dramatically pending in U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh for more than 9 years under section 221(g). The applicants son retained our law firm to represent his case with U.S. Embassy, Dhaka. After our strong submission on point of law eventually his visa was issued by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Case-24

We successfully represented a businessman who visited U.S. under B1/B2 (Visit) Visa probably two times and when he returned to Bangladesh and applied for a new visa in U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh and his visa interview was successful but his visa application was pending under Administrative Processing for more than 15 months. Technically his visa application was denied under section 221(g). He then retained our law firm. Our submission was successfully approved by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka and the applicant including his wife and children were issued new B1/B2 five (5) years multiple visa by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Case-25

After a consular officer erroneously counted an applicants time of unlawful presence in the United States, we helped her overcome this finding and have her time of inadmissibility reduced to three years from ten years.

Case-26

Our inquiry to a consulate about the reason for a material misrepresentation finding prompted a consular officer to review the decision, which had been made five years prior, and reverse that decision.

Case-27

We helped a consular officer see the “forest through the trees” in a re-application after a denial of an old woman whose brother is an elite businessman. Although she was unemployed, which was the basis for the 214(b) denial, she had no need to work because her brother was wealthy and supported her.

Case-28

A green card holder resided in Bangladesh for many years and grew tired of maintaining a residence, including paying taxes, in the US. We assisted him in the I-407 process of abandoning his permanent residency status: completing the necessary forms, counselling him on the consequences of his actions, accompanying him to the Embassy to relinquish his green card and assisting him in obtaining a visitor visa.

Case-29

After a consular officer decided to return an already-approved work visa petition for revocation to USCIS, we were able to intervene on behalf of the visa applicant/beneficiary and have the officers decision reversed and the visa issued.

Case-30

We helped an applicant obtain a non-immigrant visa waiver to visit her daughter and grandchildren after she had been accused of alien smuggling. Two years later, we helped her renew the waiver to enable her to continue to visit her family in the US.

Case-31

We helped a student overcome four previous denials and obtain a student visa.

Case-32

After a consular officer accused an applicant of entering into a sham marriage and permanently barring him. The applicant then retained our law firm. We gathered substantial evidence proving the legitimacy of the marriage. After reviewing the evidence and submission the U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh reversed its decision and issued visa to the applicant.

Case-33

We helped an applicant obtain an immigrant waiver from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh to join her husband in the United States after she had been found to commit a material misrepresentation.

Case-34

A consular officer mistakenly believed that an applicant had spent eight months in the United States, and denied the applicant under 214(b) for residing in the US. In fact, the applicant had only spent four months in the US and after we presented evidence confirming this, he was issued a visa by U.S. Embassy, Dhaka.

Case-35

We assisted a first-time applicant receive a visa from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka to attend the wedding of his nephew in the US, notwithstanding his lack of international travel, his lack of family ties in Bangladesh.

Case-36

We helped an applicant to obtain a child adoption immigrant visa from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh after Bangladeshi-U.S. Citizen falling victim to an incompetent lawyer. The dual Citizen i.e. Bangladesh-American Citizen was advised by so-called lawyer of Bangladesh that Bangladesh-American can bring his prospective adoptive daughter without fulfil cross boarder requirements. The lawyer advised him that he needs to execute an affidavit regarding adoption. In fact, the so-called lawyer does not know the legal, convincing evidence and requirement of Child Adoption and Adoption Visa of U.S. There have been a number of instances in which U.S.A. resided Bangladeshi Citizens have been poorly advised by legal practitioners of Bangladesh and have entered into fostering/adoption arrangements, do not meet the complex Bangladesh and U.S. legal and immigration requirement. Adoptions that do not meet these requirements will not meet the requirements for the issuance of U.S. immigrant visa for the adopted child. U.S. citizens intending to adopt a child in Bangladesh should not attempt to circumvent the proper processes. The applicant retained our law firm as we are the only law firm in Bangladesh have first-hand as well as significant experience in Child Adoption/ Legal Guardianship and U.S. Adoption Visa Process. We successfully handled Bangladeshi-U.S. Citizens adoptive childs case and finally obtained adoptive daughters adoption immigrant visa from U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh and the adopted child was able to join with her adoptive parents in USA legally and permanently.

Case-37

The applicant was involved in an unusual case. He was charged with a crime of moral turpitude, a conviction for which would render him inadmissible to the United States. But before going to trial, he was amnestied under a nationwide decree, with the court not making any decision on his guilt. We prepared a Legal Opinion for the consular officer, arguing that because he had not been convicted nor admitted to guilt, that he was not inadmissible. After reviewing our opinion, the consular officer of U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh issued an immigrant visa to the applicant.

Case-38

We assisted Bangladeshi-U.S. Citizens brothers as referred to beneficiaries/visa applicants of F4 immigrant visa category. After poorly and improperly filing I-130 petition by the Petitioner USCIS issued to the petitioner Request for Evidence (RFE). It is essential that the petitioner should understand exactly what the petitioner should submit prior filing I-130 Petition and also is being asked to prove before responding to RFE notice issued by USCIS. The petitioner was asked by USCIS to submit credible documentary evidences including credible submission regarding proof of Relationship, Late issued Birth Certificate of the Petitioner and Beneficiary and so on. The petitioner was born in the year of 1964 in Bangladesh and the beneficiaries were born in the year of 1962, 1967 and 1974 in Bangladesh. But the petitioners birth certificate was issued in the year of 2003 and the beneficiaries birth certificates were issued in the year of 2010. Another issue was that in the Birth Certificate of Petitioner the full name of his Father was not matched with the birth certificate of the beneficiaries. The petitioner and beneficiaries then retained our law firm. We carefully prepared various credible documentary evidences together with acceptable brief explanation in the context of complex Bangladesh Civil Law and U.S. Immigration, Expert Opinion, many other documentary evidences and so on against late issued Birth Certificate of the Petitioner and Beneficiary which proof that they are son and daughter of one common biological parent. We respond to the RFE together with credible additional supporting documentary evidences within the time frame indicated in RFE Notice and got I-130 petition approved by USCIS.

Case-39

After submitting inconsistent and poor supporting documents in response to Request for Evidence (RFE), later USCIS issued Notice of Intend to Deny (NOID) to the Bangladeshi-U.S. Citizen Petitioner which caused anxiety, worry and even possible denial petition for immigration applicants. Applications and petitions that are not properly filed are rejected with an explanation of why the application is rejected and the corrective action needed. It is essential that the petitioner should understand exactly what the petitioner is being asked to prove before responding to a RFE issued by USCIS. Example of Request for Evidence (RFE) include but not limited to submit further credible documentary evidences including credible submission regarding proof of Relationship, Late issued Birth Certificate of the Petitioner and Beneficiary and so on. The petitioner and beneficiaries then retained our law firm. We carefully prepared various credible documentary evidences together with acceptable brief explanation in the context of complex Bangladesh Civil Law and U.S. Immigration, Expert Opinion, many other documentary evidences and so on and responded Notice of Intend to Deny (NOID) within the timeframe indicated in Notice of Intend to Deny (NOID) and got I-130 petition approved.

Case-40

The applicant applied to the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh after his companys L-1 petition was approved. But rather than process his visa application, the consular officer “sat on” it. The consular officer sought to punish the applicant because the visa officer believed that the applicant and his family had spent too much time in the US on B2 visas. Because of the consular inaction, the validity period for the L-1 petition expired and his company had to submit a new petition to USCIS. After the petition was re-approved, the applicant re-applied for an L-1 visa. This time, the consular officer denied the application. The applicant then retained our firm, and we brought this to the attention of the Consul General and Washington. After a new interview, the applicant was issued his L-1 visa.

Case-41

The applicant is a bona fide businessman of Bangladesh had applied E-2 (Investment) Visa to the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. But rather than process his E-2 visa application, the consular officer “sat on” it. The consular officer sought to punish the applicant because the visa officer believed that the applicant and his family had spent too much time in the US on B2 visas and refused his E-2 visa under section 214(b) of INA.  The applicant then retained our firm, and we brought this to the attention of the Consul General and Washington. After a new interview, the applicant was issued his E-2 (Investment) visa.

Case-42

The applicant is a Bangladesh-U.S. Citizen whos baby was born in Bangladesh. The applicant then retained our law firm to Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) of his child and apply for the Childs first passport to U.S. Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh. We prepared necessary application documents and took appointment schedule on behalf of our client with U.S. Embassy, Dhaka regarding the birth abroad of his child and apply for the Childs first passport. After filing proper application documents and application fee together with supporting credible documentary evidences within stipulated appointment schedule U.S. Embassy Dhaka, Bangladesh approved our application and issued U.S. Passport and Birth record of Child of U.S. Citizen.

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